Monday, February 20, 2006

Nano at the forefront

Golf: Can nano cure the slice? (American Public Media's Future Tense)

Blogger's Note: Pardon my nanodust. Just experimenting with a soft relaunch. -- HL

9 comments:

Daniel said...

I'm excited about the return (soft or otherwise), Howard.

Anonymous said...

Yes, we're all excited. Just don't spend too much time on it, Howard.

Howard Lovy said...

Yes, Dear ...

Elliot Lovy said...

Welcome back NanoBot!

Justin Hayward said...

Good to see you back Howard. Hope you're still employed!

Howard Lovy said...

Thanks, Elliot! Hope you've finally returned "Primer" to the video store, bro. As for me, I've put it back into my Netflix queue. I'm going to figure that movie out if I have to watch it 365 times! And, Justin, that should help answer your question ...

Stephen said...

Wow, it's great that you are back. I found your nano blog very informative and had read many of the posts. Thanks.

The Nanoethics Group said...

I knew you couldn't leave us...glad you're back... ;)

As a recovering golf addict, I can't believe it's taken so long for the golf industry to jump on the bandwagon, which is notorious for overstating the benefits of new equipment. (Golf ball that will cure your slice?? Yeah, right.)

But one quibble with nano-golf balls is this. Considering that golf balls are notorious for getting lost in the woods or in ponds (for years!) AND that golfers tend to not use the same ball after more than 1-2 rounds (i.e., they all have short life-spans and then get thrown away), there's a real question on what will happen to these nano golf balls in the open environment:

Because the nanomaterial they use is supposed to be so durable, how degradable are they? (Maybe this is a criticsm of all golf balls...) If a nano golf ball is taken apart or chopped up (by, say, a fairway mower), how persistent will that material be - and is there a health risk if someone were to come into contact/breathe it in?

Can anyone tell me if the manufacturer tested for these contingencies? If not, should they be??...

Andy said...

Interesting blog... Just happened upon it today.

Nanoethics: I don't think that they would be any more dangerous than a regular golf ball. The "nano" part would probably be carbon nanofibers and though an irritant and possible carcinogen when they're in fiber form, they're not harmful when integrated with polymers and other substances.

-Andy